The Book of Iod: Ten Cthulhu Stories

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From one of the grand masters of science-fiction comes a collection inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos.

“[A] pomegranate writer: popping with seeds—full of ideas.” —Ray Bradbury

Hugo-nominee and sci-fi luminary Henry Kuttner was part of the Lovecraft Circle, submitting plot ideas and draft manuscripts to H.P. Lovecraft himself, and Kuttner played an important role in developing the Cthulhu Mythos, one of the seminal works of the genre.

The Book of Iod is a short story collection containing ten Cthulhu Mythos stories.These stories include:
The Secret of Kralitz
The Eater of Souls
The Salem Horror
The Just of Droom-avista
Spawn of Dagon
The Invaders
The Frog
Hydra
Bells of Horror
The Hunt

Elak of Atlantis

Swords and Sorcery clash with riveting results in these four classic stories!

“[A] pomegranate writer: popping with seeds—full of ideas.” —Ray Bradbury

When Robert E. Howard died in 1936, some of the greatest science-fiction and fantasy writers stepped into the void to pen amazing tales of swords and sorcery. Weird Tales published these four stories by iconic author Henry Kuttner, perfect for fans of Conan the Barbarian, and vital for every fantasy reader. Depicting a brutal world of swords and magic, with a hint of the Lovecraft mythos, Kuttner unleashes four tales as vital in today’s Game of Thrones world as they were when they first published.

These stories include:
Thunder In the Dawn
The Spawn Of Dagon
Beyond The Phoenix
Dragon Moon

The Mask of Circe

A psychiatrist travels to a world of magic and gods in this take on “Jason and the Argonauts” from the Hugo Award–nominated author of Earth’s Last Citadel.

Jay Seward remembers a former life in a land of magic, gods, and goddesses—a time when he was Jason of Iolcus, sailing in the enchanted ship Argo to steal the Golden Fleece from the serpent-temples of Apollo. But one night the memories become startlingly real, as the Argo itself sails out of the spectral mists and a hauntingly beautiful voice calls: “Jason . . . come to me!”

And suddenly he’s on the deck of the Argo, sailing into danger and magic . . .

“A fantasy in the grand tradition of Merritt and the other giants.” —Arthur Leo Zagat, author of the Tomorrow series

Praise for Henry Kuttner
“One of the all-time major names in science fiction.” —The New York Times

“A neglected master.” —Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451

Robots Have No Tails (complete collection of Galloway Gallegher stories)

 from “one of the major names in science fiction” (The New York Times).

In this comprehensive collection, Henry Kuttner is back with Galloway Gallegher, his most beloved character in the stories that helped make him famous. Gallegher is a binge-drinking scientist who’s a genius when drunk and totally clueless sober. Hounded by creditors and government officials, he wakes from each bender to discover a new invention designed to solve all his problems—if only he knew how it worked . . .

Add a vain and uncooperative robot assistant, a heckling grandfather, and a host of uninvited guests—from rabbit-like aliens to time-traveling mafia lawyers to his own future corpse—and Gallegher has more on his hands than even he can handle. Time for another drink!

“[A] pomegranate writer: popping with seeds—full of ideas.” —Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 421

The Dark World

The Dark World
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One of the earlier example of what is no known as “portal fantasy”

World War II veteran Edward Bond’s recuperation from a disastrous fighter plane crash takes a distinct turn for the weird when he encounters a giant wolf, a red witch, and the undeniable power of the need-fire, a portal to a world of magic and swordplay at once terribly new and hauntingly familiar. In the Dark World, Bond opposes the machinations of the dread lord Ganelon and his terrible retinue of werewolves, wizards, and witches, but all is not as it seems in this shadowy mirror of the real world, and Bond discovers that a part of him feels more at home here than he ever has on Earth.

Earth’s Last Citadel

Four WWII combatants travel to a distant and dangerous future in this novel by “two of the most revered names from [science fiction’s] Golden Age” (SFReviews.net).

During World War II, four bitter enemies are pulled forward a billion years in time by a master being from an alien galaxy. They arrive on a dying Earth—to Carcasilla, Earth’s last citadel—where the mutated remnants of humanity are making their final stand against the monstrous creations of a fading world.

Thrust in the middle of this desperate struggle for survival, the last humans must put aside their differences and stop the looming Armageddon.

Praise for Henry Kuttner
“One of the all-time major names in science fiction.” —The New York Times

“A neglected master.” —Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451

“Kuttner is magic.” —Joe R. Lansdale, author of The Thicket