The Moonshine War: A Novel

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Death Comes Too Late

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Prohibition is a big headache for some . . . and a big payday for others, the fearless entrepreneurs with little respect for the law of the land. With $125,000 worth of Kentucky’s finest homemade whiskey in his possession, big, hell-raising Son Martin counts himself among the latter. Son knows having this much illegal hooch makes him a very tasty target, but nobody’s going to steal it from him. Ware may be coming to his backyard, but Son’s not worried. Because when it comes to fighting, shooting, and keeping one step ahead of the Big Boys, he’s more than good—he’s bad . . . and dangerous . . . and deadly.

City Primeval: High Noon in Detroit

THE INSPIRATION FOR JUSTIFIED: CITY PRIMEVAL ON FX

“As gritty and hard-driving a thriller as you’ll find….The action never stops, the language sings and stings.” —Washington Post

The City Primeval in Elmore Leonard’s relentlessly gripping classic noir is Detroit, the author’s much-maligned hometown and the setting for many of the Grand Master’s acclaimed crime novels. The “Alexander the Great of crime fiction” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) shines in these urban mean streets, setting up a downtown showdown between the psychopathic, thrill-killing “Oklahoma Wildman” and the dedicated city cop who’s determined to take him down. The creator of U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens of TV’s Justified fame, Elmore Leonard is the equal of any writer who has ever captivated readers with dark tales of heists, hijacks, double-crosses, and murder—John D. MacDonald, Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain, and Robert Parker included—and nobody then or now is better.